Contents


The Glories of Yiddish

History of the Yiddish Language by Max Weinreich, edited by Paul Glasser, translated from the Yiddish by Shlomo Noble with the assistance of Joshua A. Fishman

A Field Guide to the Birders

Of a Feather: A Brief Historyof American Birding by Scott Weidensaul

Flights Against the Sunset: Stories that Reunited a Mother and Son by Kenn Kaufman

Birdwatcher: The Life of Roger Tory Peterson by Elizabeth J. Rosenthal

The Life of the Skies: Birding at the End of Nature by Jonathan Rosen

The Last Flight of the Scarlet Macaw: One Woman’s Fight to Save the World’s Most Beautiful Bird by Bruce Barcott

Green Fantasia

Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution—and How It Can Renew America by Thomas L. Friedman

Victims of Vermeermania

The Man Who Made Vermeers: Unvarnishing the Legend of Master Forger Han van Meegeren by Jonathan Lopez

The Forger’s Spell: A True Story of Vermeer, Nazis, and the Greatest Art Hoax of the Twentieth Century by Edward Dolnick

The Deceptive Director

Otto Preminger: The Man Who Would Be King by Foster Hirsch

The World and Its Double:The Life and Work of Otto Preminger by Chris Fujiwara

Preminger: An Autobiography by Otto Preminger

China’s Golden Age

China: At the Court of the Emperors: Unknown Masterpieces from Han Tradition to Tang Elegance (25–907) an exhibition at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, March 7–June 8, 2008

Poems of the Late T’ang translated from the Chinese and with an introduction by A.C. Graham

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at NYU. His ­latest book, The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity, is based on his 2016 BBC Reith Lectures. (May 2019)

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.
 (December 2019)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Harold Bloom’s most recent books are The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible. He teaches at Yale and is at work on a play, To You Whoever You are: A Pageant Celebrating Walt Whitman.
 (February 2012)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient ­History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His latest book is The Crucible of Islam.
 (November 2019)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. He is the author, most recently, of American Breakdown: The Trump Years and How They Befell Us.
 (December 2019)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Andrew Delbanco is Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia and President of the Teagle Foundation. His most recent book is The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for America’s Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War. (January 2019)

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Robert English is a Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, and the author of Russia and the Idea of the West. (November 2008)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (May 2019)

Frances FitzGerald’s books include Fire in the Lake: The Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam and, most recently, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America. (November 2017)

Mark Ford’s fourth collection of poetry, Enter, Fleeing, was published last year.
 (July 2019)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier Professor of Political Economy at Harvard and the author of The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth. He is currently finishing a book on the historical influence of religious thinking on economic thinking.
 (June 2019)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. A new edition of his book The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague will be published this fall.
 (October 2019)

Barry Goldensohn is the author of five collections of poems: St. Venus Eve, Uncarving the Block, The Marrano, Dance Music, and, with his wife, Lorrie, East Long Pond. (December 2008)

Amy Knight is a former Woodrow Wilson Fellow. Her most recent book is Orders to Kill: The Putin Regime and Political Murder.
 (March 2019)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (July 2016)

Joseph Lelyveld’s most recent book is His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt. (November 2017)

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org and Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury. His new book is ­Falter: Has the Human Game Played Itself Out?

 (April 2019)

Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor Emeritus of Social Science at Columbia and the author of The Anatomy of Fascism, Vichy France, and, with Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, among other works.
 (December 2018)

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (November 2018)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Man Who Kept the ­Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA and Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda. (June 2019)

Arnold Relman (1923–2014) was Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a contributor of many articles and essays to The New York Review. Marcia Angell is a Senior Lecturer in Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Arnold Relman was her husband.

Nathaniel Rich’s latest novel is King Zeno. His next book, Losing Earth: A Recent History, will be published in April.
 (March 2019)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. His book If We Can Keep It: How the Republic ­Collapsed, and How It Might Be Saved was published this year.
 (December 2019)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.

Jose Miguel Vivanco is Americas director of Human Rights Watch. (November 2008)

Eliot Weinberger is the editor of the Calligrams series published by the Chinese University of Hong Kong Press and New York Review Books and the literary editor of the Murty Classical Library of India. Among his books of essays are An Elemental Thing and the forthcoming The Ghosts of Birds.
 (February 2016)

Daniel Wilkinson is Managing Director for the Americas at Human Rights Watch.

Garry Wills, a journalist and historian, is the author of numerous books, including Nixon Agonistes (1970), Inventing America (1978), Explaining America: The Federalist (1981), and Lincoln at Gettysburg (1993), which won a Pulitzer Prize that year. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters (2017). (November 2019)

Francis Wyndham was born in London in 1924. He graduated from Eton in 1940 and spent a year at Oxford before being drafted into the army in 1942. When it became clear that he was suffering from tuberculosis, he was dismissed from service and returned to London, where he began writing reviews for The Times Literary Supplement and working on the short stories that would later be collected in Out of the War (not published until 1974). During the 1950s he worked as a critic and editor at Queen and in 1964 was hired by The Sunday Times, where he stayed until 1980. He collaborated with David King on Trotsky: A Documentary and is the author of a collection of essays, The Theatre of Embarrassment; a novel, The Other Garden (winner of the 1987 Whitbread First Novel Award); and co-editor of The Letters of Jean Rhys.