Contents


Occupied Paris: The Sweet and the Cruel

The Journal of Hélène Berr translated from the French and with an introduction and an essay by David Bellos, and an afterword by Mariette Job

Journal, 1940–1950 by Philippe Jullian

Résistance: Memoirs of Occupied France by Agnès Humbert, translated from the French and with notes by Barbara Mellor, and an afterword by Julien Blanc

Jean Cocteau by Claude Arnaud

1940–1945 Années érotiques: De la Grande Prostituée à la revanche des mâles by Patrick Buisson

Les Parisiens sous l’Occupation: Photographies en couleurs d’André Zucca by Jean Baronnet, with a preface by Jean-Pierre Azéma

Bacon Agonistes

Francis Bacon: A Centenary Exhibition an exhibition at Tate Britain, London, September 11, 2008–January 4, 2009, the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, February 3–April 19, 2009, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, May 20–August 16, 2009

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of ­Archaeology, University ­College London. (May 2018)

Stanisław Barańczak is a poet, translator, and literary critic. He won the 2007 Nike Award for the best work of Polish literature published in the previous year and the 2009 Silesius Poetry Award for lifetime achievement. He is a professor of Polish language and literature at Harvard University.

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay: Reflections on Art, Family, and Survival.
 (August 2018)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” He has written over seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). His ­memoir, A Tokyo Romance, has just been published. (April 2018)

Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern.
 (November 2017)

Robert Darnton’s A Literary Tour de France: The World of Books on the Eve of the French Revolution was published in February. He is the Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian Emeritus at Harvard. (June 2018)

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Richard Dorment was the art critic for the Daily Telegraph between 1986 and 2015.

Mark Ford’s latest book is Thomas Hardy: Half a Londoner. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (October 2017)

Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard. His most recent book is The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve. (May 2018)

Jerome Groopman is the Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chief of Experimental Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and a staff writer at The New Yorker. He is the coauthor, with Pamela Hartzband, of Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You. 
(June 2018)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

John Lanchester is the author of four novels and four books of nonfiction including, most recently, How to Speak Money: What the Money People Say—And What It Really Means. (November 2016)

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Jay Neugeboren is the author of twenty-two books of fiction and nonfiction, including the memoir Imagining Robert: My Brother, Madness, and Survival and, most recently, the novel Max Baer and the Star of David. (January 2017)

John Richardson’s four-volume Life of Picasso is due to be finished this year. (May 2016)

Christopher Ricks teaches at Boston University in the Core Curriculum and the Editorial Institute and is a former president of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers. From 2004 to 2009 he was Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford. His recent books include True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Lowell Under the Sign of Eliot and Pound and Decisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest book is The Collector of Lives: Giorgio ­Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney.
 (June 2018)

Malise Ruthven’s books include Islam in the World and Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning. He recently edited Carving Up the Globe: An Atlas of Diplomacy, to be published in June.
 (June 2018)

Cathleen Schine’s latest novel is They May Not Mean to but They Do. (August 2018)

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

David Shulman’s Freedom and Despair: Notes from the South Hebron Hills 
will be published in October. He is Professor Emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and was awarded the Israel Prize for Religious Studies in 2016. (June 2018)

Wisława Szymborska (1923–2012) won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1996.

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.