Contents


The Customs of the Country

The I.G. in Peking: Letters of Robert Hart, Chinese Maritime Customs, 1868-1907 edited by John King Fairbank, by Katherine Frost Bruner, by Elizabeth MacLeod Matheson, with an introduction by L.K. Little

Trumbull’s Klutzy Triumph

Trumbull: The Declaration of Independence by Irma B. Jaffe

John Trumbull: Patriot-Artist of the American Revolution by Irma B. Jaffe

Paul Revere’s Boston: 1735-1818 Graphic Society by Walter M. Whitehill

The Eye of Thomas Jefferson edited by William Howard Adams

Maryland Heritage edited by John B. Boles

French Painting 1774-1830: The Age of Revolution

The Paris Opéra in New York

The Marriage of Figaro by Mozart, libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, directed by Giorgio Strehler, designed by Ezio Frijerio, conducted by Georg Solti

Otello by Verdi, libretto by Arrigo Boito, staged by Terry Hands, designed by Joseph Svoboda, conducted by Georg Solti

Faust by Gounod, libretto by Barbier and Carré, staged by Jorge Lavelli, designed by Max Bignen, conducted by Michel Plasson

The Mystery of Jean Bodin

Colloquium of the Seven about Secrets of the Sublime (Colloquium Heptaplomeres de Rerum Sublimium Arcanis Abditis) annotations, and critical readings by by Jean Bodin, translated with an introduction, Marion Leathers Daniels Kuntz

Contributors

C. B. A. Behrens (1904–1989) was a British historian of Europe. She was the author of The Ancien Régimeand Society, Government and The Enlightenment.

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

John K. Fairbank (1907–1991) was an American sinologist. His final book was China: A New History.

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908–2006) was a Canadian economist and politician. He taught at Princeton and Harvard. His works include The Affluent Society, The Age of Uncertainty and Economics and the Public Purpose. Galbraith’s many honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Lomonosov Gold Medal, the Order of Canada, and the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian award.

William H. Gass (b. 1924) is an essayist, novelist, and literary critic. He grew up in Ohio and is a former professor of philosophy at Washington University. Among his books are six works of fiction and nine books of essays, including Tests of Time (2002), A Temple of Texts (2006), and Life Sentences (2012). New York Review Books will republish his story collection In the Heart of the Heart of the Country (1968) in 2014. Gass lives with his wife, the architect Mary Gass, in St. Louis.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Lincoln Kirstein (1907–1996) was a writer and ballet critic. In 1946, together with George Balanchine, Kirstein founded the Ballet Society, which would soon be renamed The New York City Ballet. In 1984 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Robert Penn Warren (1936–2011) was an American novelist, poet and critic. From 1944 until 1945 he served as Consultant in Poetry—the position would later become Poet Laureate—to the Library of Congress.

John Thompson is an English sociologist. He has published several studies of the media and communication in modern societies, including The Media and Modernity: A Social Theory of the Mediaand Political Scandal: Power and Visibility in the Media Age.

H. R. Trevor-Roper (1914–2003) was a British historian and the author of The Last Days of Hitler. He taught at Oxford, where he was the Regius Professor Modern History.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.

Frances A. Yates (1899–1981) was an English historian. She taught for many years at The Warburg Institute, where she studied the history of esotericism in the West.