Contents


Prima Donna

Sappho: Lyrics in the Original Greek with Translations by Willis Barnstone

Sappho: Poems and Fragments translated, with an Introduction and Guy Davenport

The Century of Crisis

Crisis in Europe, 1560-1660 edited by Trevor Aston

The Revolution of the Saints by Michael Walzer

The World We Have Lost by Peter Laslett

Ultra Writer

Selected Letters of Malcolm Lowry edited by Harvey Breit, edited by Margerie Bonner Lowry

Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry, Reissued with an Introduction by Stephen Spender

Contributors

Sybille Bedford (1911–2006) was born Sybille von Schoenebeck in Charlottenburg, Germany, to an aristocratic German father and a partly Jewish, British-born mother. Raised variously in Germany, Italy, France, and England, she lived with her mother and Italian stepfather after her father’s death when she was seven, and was educated privately. Encouraged by Aldous Huxley, Bedford began writing fiction at the age of sixteen and went on to publish four novels, all influenced by her itinerant childhood among the European aristocracy: A Legacy (1956), A Favourite of the Gods (1963), A Compass Error (1968), and Jigsaw (1989, short-listed for the Booker Prize). She married Walter Bedford in 1935 and lived briefly in America during World War II, before returning to England. She was a prolific travel writer, the author of a two-volume biography of her friend Aldous Huxley, and a legal journalist, covering nearly one hundred trials. In 1981 she was awarded the Order of the British Empire.

Denis Donoghue is Emeritus University Professor of English and American Letters at NYU. (April 2016)

Edgar Z. Friedenberg (1927-2000) was an American social critic and scholar of education. His books include Coming of Age in America and Growth and Acquiescence.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916–2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Philip Rahv (1908–1973) was an American literary critic. Rahv was a founding editor of Partisan Review. His works include Image and Idea and Literature and the Sixth Sense.

Lawrence Stone (1919–1999) was an English historian. He taught British history at Oxford and Princeton.

Stephen Toulmin (1922–2009) was a British philosopher. First outlined in The Uses of Argument, his model for analyzing arguments has had a lasting influence on fields as diverse as law, computer science and communications theory. Toulmin’s other works include The Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning and Return to Reason.

Frances A. Yates (1899–1981) was an English historian. She taught for many years at The Warburg Institute, where she studied the history of esotericism in the West.