Contents


Balloons

Nil: Episodes in the Literary Conquest of Void during the Nineteenth Century by Robert Martin Adams

A World Elsewhere: The Place of Style in American Literature by Richard Poirier

In the Human Grain: Technological Culture and Its Effect on Man, Literature and Religion by Walter J. Ong and S.J.

Light Mischief

Overcharge: How Electric Utilities Exploit and Mislead the Public, and What You Can Do About It by US Senator Lee Metcalf and Vic Reinemer

Culture Cults

The Paths of Culture: A General Ethnology by Kaj Birket-Smith

Stranger and Friend: The Way of an Anthropologist by Hortense Powdermaker

Absolute Beginners

Ambiguous Africa: Cultures in Collision by Georges Balandier

False Start in Africa by René Dumont

Africa’s Search for Identity by Victor C. Ferkiss

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland, and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.
 (April 2019)

Nina Berberova (1901–1993) was born in St. Petersburg. She and her companion Vladislav Khodasevich, later described by Vladimir Nabokov as the “greatest Russian poet of our time,” lived in the household of Maxim Gorky for some years before emigrating to Paris. Khodasevich died in 1939, and in 1950 Berberova moved to the United States, where she taught herself English and worked as a clerk before becoming a professor of Russian literature at Princeton in 1963. In 1985, the novellas Berberova had written in the 1930s about Russian émigrés living in Paris were rediscovered by Hubert Nyssen, the director of the French publishing house Actes Sud, who began a program of reissuing her works, which include The Ladies from St. Petersburg, The Tattered Cloak, The Book of Happiness, The Accompanist, and an autobiography, The Italics Are Mine.

Denis Donoghue is Emeritus University Professor of English and American Letters at NYU. (April 2016)

F. W. Dupee was a literary critic and essayist. Dupee was a founding editor of The Partisan Review and literary editor of The New Masses. He taught at Bowdoin, Bard and Columbia.

Edgar Z. Friedenberg (1927-2000) was an American social critic and scholar of education. His books include Coming of Age in America and Growth and Acquiescence.

Stuart Hampshire (1914–2004) was an English philosopher. He taught at University College London, Princeton, Stanford and Oxford, where he was named Warden of Wadham College. His books include Thought and Action, Spinoza and Justice Is Conflict.

Francis Haskell (1928-2000) was an English art historian. His works include Patrons and Painters: Art and Society in Baroque Italyand History and its Images: Art and the Interpretation of the Past. Haskell taught at Oxford.

Edmund R. Leach (1910–1989) was a British anthropologist. He is widely credited with introducing Anglophone readers to the work of Claude Lévi-Strauss. Leach served as provost of King’s College, Cambridge from 1966 until 1979; he was made a Fellow of the British Academy in 1972 and knighted in 1975. A two-volume selection of his writings, The Essential Edmund Leach, was published by Yale University Press in 2001.

Marina Tsvetayeva (1892-1941) was a Russian poet and memoirist.