Contents


Machines Without a Cause

Technological Change: Its Impact on Man and Society by Emmanuel G. Mesthene

La Civilisation au carrefour by Radovan Richta

Innovations: Scientific, Technological and Social by Dennis Gabor

Run, Computer, Run: The Mythology of Educational Innovation by Anthony G. Oettinger and Sema Marks

Overskill: The Decline of Technology in Modern Civilization by Eugene S. Schwartz

Too Much Mustard

The Complete Immortalia edited by Harold H. Hart

The Gambit Book of Popular Verse edited by Geoffrey Grigson

Black Conspiracies

Denmark Vesey: The Slave Conspiracy of 1822 edited by Robert S. Starobin

The Southampton Slave Revolt of 1831: A Compilation of Source Materials by Henry Irving Tragle

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.
 (December 2019)

W.H. Auden (1907–1973) was an English poet, playwright, and essayist who lived and worked in the United States for much of the second half of his life. His work, from his early strictly metered verse, and plays written in collaboration with Christopher Isherwood, to his later dense poems and penetrating essays, represents one of the major achievements of twentieth-century literature.

Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a philosopher and historian of ideas who held the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory at Oxford. The final volume of his correspondence, Affirming: Letters 1975–1997, was published in December 2015.

Eric Foner is the DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University. His books include The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery and Battles for Freedom: The Use and Abuse of American History.
 (December 2017)

Edgar Z. Friedenberg (1927-2000) was an American social critic and scholar of education. His books include Coming of Age in America and Growth and Acquiescence.

Robert Mazzocco (1932–2017) was an American poet and critic.

V. S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932 and emigrated to England in 1950, when he won a scholarship to University College, Oxford. He is the author of many novels, including A House for Mr. Biswas, A Bend in the River, and In a Free State, which won the Booker Prize. He has also written several nonfiction works based on his travels, including India: A Million Mutinies Now and Beyond Belief: Islamic Excursions Among the Converted Peoples. He was knighted in 1990 and in 1993 was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize.

Stephen Spender (1909–1995) was an English poet and essayist. As a young man, he became friends with W.H. Auden, Louis MacNeice, Cecil Day-Lewis, and Christopher Isherwood, a loose collection often referred to as “the Auden Group” or “MacSpaunday.” He published many collections of poems, including The Still Centre and Ruins and Visions, and numerous volumes of nonfiction and other works, including Learning Laughterand Love-Hate Relations.

A.J.P. Taylor (1906–1990) was a British diplomatic historian.