Contents


The Lamp in the Mausoleum

The View from Castle Rock: Stories by Alice Munro

Carried Away: A Selection of Stories by Alice Munro, with an introduction by Margaret Atwood

Alice Munro: Writing Her Lives: A Biography by Robert Thacker

Lives of Mothers and Daughters: Growing Up with Alice Munro by Sheila Munro

The Enigma of Ariel Sharon

Ariel Sharon: A Life by Nir Hefez and Gadi Bloom, translated from the Hebrew by Mitch Ginsburg

Ariel Sharon: An Intimate Portrait by Uri Dan

Politicide: The Real Legacy of Ariel Sharon by Baruch Kimmerling

Islam: The Russian Solution

For Prophet and Tsar: Islam and Empire in Russia and Central Asia by Robert D. Crews

Islam in Russia: The Politics of Identity and Security by Shireen T. Hunter with Jeffrey L. Thomas and Alexander Melikishvili, and with a foreword by Ambassador James F. Collins

Iraq: The War of the Imagination

State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III by Bob Woodward

The One Percent Doctrine: Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11 by Ron Suskind

State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration by James Risen

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of ­Archaeology, University ­College London. (May 2018)

Margaret Atwood is the author of more than forty books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays, including the 2000 Booker Prize–winning The Blind Assassin; Alias Grace, which won the Giller Prize and the Premio Mondello; The Robber Bride, Cat’s Eye, The Handmaid’s Tale, and The Penelopiad. Her latest work is a book of short stories called Stone Mattress: Nine Tales (2014). Her newest novel, Madd­Addam (2013) is the third in a trilogy comprising The Year of the Flood (2009) and the Giller and Booker Prize–nominated Oryx and Crake (2003). Atwood lives in Toronto with the writer Graeme Gibson.

John Banville’s Time Pieces: A Dublin Memoir is published in February. (February 2018)

Anne Carson is a poet who was born in Canada and teaches ancient Greek, sometimes at NYU. Float, her new collection of prose and poetry, was published in October.
 (December 2016)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

John Demos is the Samuel Knight Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic. (December 2015)

Richard Dorment was the art critic for the Daily Telegraph between 1986 and 2015.

Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. His latest book is Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991: A History.

 (July 2018)

Mark Ford’s fourth collection of poetry, Enter, Fleeing, was published earlier this year.
 (November 2018)

Jonathan Freedland is an editorial-page columnist for The Guardian. His latest novel is To Kill the President, published under the pseudonym Sam Bourne.
 (August 2018)

P. N. Furbank is the author of nine books, including biographies of Samuel Butler, Italo Svevo, and E.M. Forster.

Alison Lurie is the Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of ten novels, two collections of essays on children’s literature, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent book is Reading for Fun. (March 2017)

William H. McNeill is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Chicago. His most recent books are The Pursuit of Truth: A Historian’s Memoir and Summers Long Ago: On Grandfather’s Farm and in Grandmother’s Kitchen, published by the Berkshire Publishing Group. His most recent publication, as editor, is the second edition of the Encyclopedia of World History.

Aryeh Neier is President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. His most recent book is The International Human Rights Movement: A History. (February 2018)

Rainier Maria Rilke (1875–1926) was a poet and novelist.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest book is The Collector of Lives: Giorgio ­Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney.
 (June 2018)

Alan Ryan is the author of On Tocqueville, On Marx, and the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought from Herodotus to the Present. 
(January 2018)

Paul Schmidt (1934-1999), translator, poet, actor, librettist, playwright, and essayist, was born in Brooklyn, the oldest of seven children. He received a degree from Colgate University in Russian studies in 1955 and, after a year of graduate work at Harvard, he moved to Paris, where he studied mime with Marcel Marceau and acting with Jacques Charon of the Comédie Française. Drafted in 1958, he served in the US Army Intelligence and on his release resumed his Russian studies; his doctoral thesis on “the stylized theater of V.E. Mejerxol’d” was published as Meyerhold at Work. For eleven years, Schmidt was a professor of Slavic languages at the University of Texas at Austin, where he won the Bromberg Award for Teaching Excellence. His Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works was published in 1975, and translations of Russian poets, notably Marina Tsvetaeva, followed. A commission from the Dia Foundation supported his translations of Velimir Khlebnikov (four volumes published between 1985 and 1997), allowing him to leave academia and move to New York City. Working with the Yale Repertory Theatre, the American Repertory Theatre, the Guthrie, and other companies, he translated Euripides, Chekhov, Brecht, Genet, Gogol, Marivaux, and Mayakovsky, and wrote three plays of his own, winning the Helen Hayes and Kesselring awards for best play for Black Sea Follies. Providing text and often performing, he collaborated with the Wooster Group and with the avant-garde directors Robert Wilson, JoAnne Akalaitis, David Schweitzer, and Peter Sellars. He also acted in film and television, and in the 1970s devised “The Lost Art of Melodeclamation,” a program of nineteenth-century works for voice and orchestra, which he toured and performed with the pianist Yvar Mikhashoff, who transposed the works for keyboard. The Plays of Anton Chekhov, Schmidt’s translation of twelve of Chekhov’s plays, was published in 1997. From 1993 until the end of his life, he taught translation and dramaturgy at the Yale School of Drama.