Contents


The Nervous Republic

Venice: Lion City: The Religion of Empire by Garry Wills

Myths of Venice: The Figuration of a State by David Rosand

The Tombs of the Doges of Venice by Debra Pincus

Wandering Minstrel

Sviatoslav Richter: Notebooks and Conversations by Bruno Monsaingeon,translated from the French by Stewart Spencer

Richter the Enigma a film by Bruno Monsaingeon

Richter
Rediscovered
Carnegie Hall Recital
RCA Red Seal

Berlin: The Lost Opportunity

City of Architecture, Architecture of the City: Berlin 1900–2000 edited by Thorsten Scheer, Josef Paul Kleihues, and Paul Kahlfeldt

Rebuilding the Reichstag by Norman Foster

The Reichstag: The Parliament Building by Norman Foster by Bernhard Schulz

Architektur in Berlin: Jahrbuch 2000 edited by the Architectenkammer, Berlin

The Unkindest Cut

Castration and the Heavenly Kingdom: A Russian Folktale by Laura Engelstein

Eunuchs and Castrati by Piotr O. Scholz

Castration: An Abbreviated History of Western Manhood by Gary Taylor

The Group

The Gang: Coleridge, the Hutchinsons & the Wordsworths in 1802 by John Worthen

The Nestor of the Rockies

Kit Carson and the Indians by Tom Dunlay

Kit Carson: Indian Fighter or Indian Killer? edited by R.C. Gordon-McCutchan

Overland with Kit Carson: A Narrative of the Old Spanish Trail in ’48 by George Douglas Brewerton

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Anne Barton is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. She is the author of Essays, Mainly Shakespearean.

M.F. Burnyeat is Senior Research Fellow in Philosophy at All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author of The Theaetetus of Plato and A Map of Metaphysics Zeta. (November 2001)

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of seventeen works of fiction, as well as ­numerous works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. (September 2019)

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Martin Filler’s most recent book is Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume III: From Antoni Gaudí to Maya Lin, a collection of his writing on architecture in these pages. (September 2019)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His books include The Polish Revolution: Solidarity and The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague.
 (August 2018)

Richard L. Garwin is Reed Senior Fellow for Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations and Adjunct Professor of Physics at Columbia. He has just published a book on nuclear weapons and nuclear power, Megawatts and Megatons: A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age? (November 2001)

Robert Gottlieb has been the Editor in Chief of ­Simon and Schuster and of Knopf, and the Editor of The New Yorker. His most recent book is a collection of essays, Near-Death Experiences…and Others. (July 2019)

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Stanley Hoffmann (1928-2015) was the Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Richard Jenkyns, a Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, is Professor of the Classical Tradition at Oxford. His most recent book is Virgil’s Experience.(November 2001)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Michael Kimmelman is a longtime critic for The New York Times. A version of his essay in this issue will appear in the collection City Squares: Eighteen Writers on the Spirit and Significance of Squares Around the World, edited by Catie Marron and published in April by Harper.
 (April 2016)

Martin Malia is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author, most recently, of Russia Under Western Eyes, from the Bronze Horseman to the Lenin Mausoleum. (November 2001)

M. F. Perutz (1914–2002) was an Austrian molecular biologist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1962. He is the author of Is Science Necessary?, Protein Structure, and I Wish I’d Made You Angry Earlier.

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (November 2018)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Man Who Kept the ­Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA and Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda. (June 2019)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest books are The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney, and The Divine Spark of Syracuse. (September 2019)