Contents


Foolish Questions

SCREWBALL!: The Cartoonists Who Made the Funnies Funny by Paul C. Tumey

The Art of Rube Goldberg an exhibition at the Museum of Pop Culture, Seattle, February 11–April 23, 2017; the Grand Rapids Art Museum, May 21–August 27, 2017; Citadelle Art Foundation and Museum, Canadian, Texas, September 15–November 26, 2017; the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, March 15–July 8, 2018; the Portland Public Library, Portland, Maine, August 3–September 22, 2018; the National Museum of American Jewish History, Philadelphia, October 12, 2018–January 21, 2019; the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science, April 28–July 21, 2019; and the Queens Museum, October 6, 2019–February 9, 2020

L’Engle’s Cosmic Catechism

The Kairos Novels: The Wrinkle in Time and Polly O’Keefe Quartets by Madeleine L’Engle, edited by Leonard S. Marcus

Penguins and Golden Calves: Icons and Idols in Antarctica and Other Unexpected Places by Madeleine L’Engle, with a foreword by Charlotte Jones Voiklis

The Rock That Is Higher: Story as Truth by Madeleine L’Engle, with a foreword by Sarah Bessey

Mao’s Shadow

Maoism: A Global History by Julia Lovell

China’s New Red Guards: The Return of Radicalism and the Rebirth of Mao Zedong by Jude Blanchette

The Art of Combat

The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, October 7, 2019–January 5, 2020

The Renaissance of Etching an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, October 23, 2019–January 20, 2020; and the Albertina Museum, Vienna, February 12–May 10, 2020

A History of Assassinations

The Compatriots: The Brutal and Chaotic History of Russia’s Exiles, Émigrés, and Agents Abroad by Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan

From Russia with Blood: The Kremlin’s Ruthless Assassination Program and Vladimir Putin’s Secret War on the West by Heidi Blake

Serfs of Academe

Adjunct by Geoff Cebula

Reclaiming the Ivory Tower: Organizing Adjuncts to Change Higher Education by Joe Berry

The Good University: What Universities Actually Do and Why It’s Time for Radical Change by Raewyn Connell

The Adjunct Underclass: How America’s Colleges Betrayed Their Faculty, Their Students, and Their Mission by Herb Childress

Where Historians Work: An Interactive Database of History PhD Career Outcomes American Historical Association. Available at www.historians.org/wherehistorianswork

Professors in the Gig Economy: Unionizing Adjunct Faculty in America edited by Kim Tolley

The Meritocracy Trap: How America’s Foundational Myth Feeds Inequality, Dismantles the Middle Class, and Devours the Elite by Daniel Markovits

Listen, Liberal: Or, What Ever Happened to the Party of the People? by Thomas Frank

Degrees of Inequality: How the Politics of Higher Education Sabotaged the American Dream by Suzanne Mettler

Undoing the Demos: Neoliberalism’s Stealth Revolution by Wendy Brown

The Great Mistake: How We Wrecked Public Universities and How We Can Fix Them by Christopher Newfield

Contributors

Paula Bohince is the author of three books of poems, most recently Swallows and Waves. She is the 2020 John Montague ­International Poetry Fellow at University College Cork. (March 2020)

Christian Caryl is an editor at the Opinions section of The Washington Post and the author of Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the Twenty-First Century. (March 2020)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011. (May 2020)

Tim Flannery’s Europe: A Natural History was ­published last year. (March 2020)

Ruth Franklin’s most recent book, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life, won the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography. (March 2020)

Caroline Fraser’s most recent book, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder, received the Pulitzer Prize for biography. Her first book, God’s Perfect Child: Living and Dying in the Christian Science Church, was reissued last fall. (May 2020)

Ian Frazier is the author of eleven books, including Great Plains, Family, On the Rez, and Travels in Siberia.
 (March 2020)

Howard W. French is a Professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He is the author of four books, ­including A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of ­Africa. He is at work on a book about the role of Africa and Africans in the l­aunching of modernity. (May 2020)

Robert Pogue Harrison teaches literature at Stanford. His latest book is Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age.
 (March 2020)

Lili Loofbourow is a staff writer at Slate. Her work has ­appeared in Best American Essays 2019, Virginia ­Quarterly ­Review, and The New York Times Magazine. She is working on a book of essays. (March 2020)

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org and Schumann ­Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury. His new book is Falter: Has the Human Game Played Itself Out?
 (March 2020)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Out of My Head: On the Trail of Consciousness and the novel In Extremis.
 (March 2020)

Charles Petersen is a Senior Editor at n+1 and a Ph.D. candidate in American Studies at Harvard. Later this year, he will join the Cornell Department of History as a Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows.
 (March 2020)

Art Spiegelman is a cartoonist and writer. His Pulitzer Prize–winning graphic novel, Maus, has just been issued as a two-volume boxed set of paperbacks with a booklet of related comics and drawings.
 (March 2020)

Brenda Wineapple’s most recent book, The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation, was published last May. (March 2020)