Contents


Pecking Orders

Empires in the Balance: Japanese and Allied Pacific Strategies to April 1942 by H.P. Willmott

From Conquest to Collapse: European Empires from 1815 to 1960 by V.G. Kiernan

The Pattern of Imperialism: The United States, Great Britain, and the Late-Industrializing World Since 1815 by Tony Smith

War and Change in World Politics by Robert Gilpin

Why Are You Scared?

Risk and Culture: An Essay on the Selection of Technical and Environmental Dangers by Mary Douglas and Aaron Wildavsky

Acceptable Risk by Baruch Fischhoff and Sarah Lichtenstein and Paul Slovic and Steven L. Derby and Ralph L. Keeney

Reds

The Red Smith Reader edited by Dave Anderson

To Absent Friends from Red Smith by Red Smith

Late Innings: A Baseball Companion by Roger Angell

1947
When All Hell Broke Loose in Baseball
by Red Barber

Classic Classicists

History of Classical Scholarship by U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, translated by Alan Harris, edited with an introduction and notes by Hugh Lloyd-Jones

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland, and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.
 (April 2019)

Harold Bloom’s most recent books are The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible. He teaches at Yale and is at work on a play, To You Whoever You are: A Pageant Celebrating Walt Whitman.
 (February 2012)

Raymond Carr was Warden of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and has written extensively on modern Spanish history.

Alexander Cockburn edits the newsletter CounterPunch and writes columns for the Los Angeles Times and The Nation.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

Ian Hacking teaches philosophy at the University of Toronto. From 2000 to 2006 Hacking held the chair of Philosophy and History of Scientific Concepts at the Collège de France. His most recent book is Historical Ontology.

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Thomas Powers’s books include The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA and Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda. (April 2018)

Wilfrid Sheed (1915–2011) was a British-American novelist and critic.

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her latest book is The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar, a collection of her most recent essays. (October 2017)

Gore Vidal (1925–2012) was an American novelist, essayist, and playwright. His many works include the memoirs Point to Point Navigation and Palimpsest, the novels The City and the Pillar, Myra Breckinridge, and Lincoln, and the collection United States: Essays 1952–1992.

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.